Safe Methods of Access For Roof Cleaning

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One of the most important factors to consider when working on a roof is the safety of the person completing the work.

Here at Concept Roof Cleaning our staff’s safety is always our number one priority, which is why we invest in the best equipment and spend time devising a bespoke plan for every property we complete work on. The same safety principles apply, no matter which method of roof cleaning is utilized ( manually scraping moss from roof tiles or roof pressure washing)

We need to consider many factors when it comes to access; these include the amount of space we have to work in, the height of the building, the ground surface, and the weather conditions. There are three critical areas of concern when completing any work on a roof, and these are 

  1. Safe Access To The Roof 
  2. Roof Edges and Openings 
  3. Any Fragile Surfaces on the roof itself. 

Safe Access To Roofs 

When we visit a property to complete a roof cleaning job, we assess the best and safest access methods. Wherever possible, we will try to use extension poles to which we can attach our tools or biocide treatments. This means that we can complete the work without actually stepping onto the roof, but this is not always an option. We have at our disposal a wide range of different equipment which includes 

• general access scaffolds

• stair towers

• fixed or mobile scaffold towers

• mobile access equipment

ladders

• roof access hatches

This means that whatever type or style of property you own, or how limited the ground area is to gain access to the roof, we will have a safe option available to give our team safe access. 

Roof Edges and Openings 

Unfortunately, a large number of people are hurt every year, falling from domestic roofs. Sloping roofs are extremely dangerous to work on, which is why it is critical to use both secured ladders for access to the roof, and specially designed roof ladders when working on the roof itself. As a company, we always focus on safety rather than cost, so although it might be a more inexpensive option to use ladders rather than scaffolding if, after assessing the site, we believe that it requires the use of scaffolding, then that is the option we will choose. 

Fragile Surfaces 

Always assume that any roof is fragile, and try to minimise the amount of weight you put on it. We regularly attend properties to clean their roofs, only to discover significant cracks or damage in the tiles when we begin the process of removing the moss. Moss is excellent at hiding any damage, in addition to causing it in the first place due to the ever changing weather conditions of the United Kingdom. Never assume that a roof is safe to bear your weight until you have it checked by a qualified roof engineer. 

Although this might seem like an overly cautious stance to take, working on a roof can be fatal if the right precautions are not implemented. In our opinion, no matter how tempting it might be, never attempt any work on your own roof without the advice and expertise of the professionals.